Making art isn’t easy, and it’s almost always weird. These three local artists will talk about the hard, bizarre, and completely-worth-it parts of their craft at this Saturday’s Making the Mountain. Here’s a preview.
Paul Karolyi is a freelance writer and podcaster. In addition to hosting and producing the Denver Pizza Podcast and Changing Denver, a monthly podcast about our city’s physical spaces, how we make them, and how they make us, he writes for the Journal of Palestine Studies, Crain’s Denver, and other publications.
Paul Karolyi

Paul Karolyi

What’s a surprising piece of equipment that you use for your craft?
For a while I was using the Nintendo social networking app Miitomo to make promotional images for the podcast. I thought it was funny to superimpose a cartoon version of me onto pictures of things depicted in the podcast. Come to think of it, I should do more of that. (It looks like this.)
Also, I don’t have a protective carrying case for my recording kit, so I stared carrying all my gear around in the thick plastic bag my bedsheets came in. It’s actually a perfect size for two mics, the Tascam, and a bunch of cords. Also, “Clearance $39.99” has almost worn off, so that’s something to look forward to.
Does your work affect your body in anyway?
Thankfully not yet, but I fear tinnitus will come for me before the end.
In one sentence, what do you love about your work?
I get to meet and work with the most interesting people in the city.
Esther Hernandez is a current resident artist at RedLine and a youth mentor through ArtCorp. She strives to create experience, which requires a multimedia approach. Her work explores stop-motion animation, performance art, ritual, and themes such as relationships, social norms and personal expression.
Esther Hernandez

Esther Hernandez

What’s a surprising piece of equipment that you use for your craft?
Every now and then I get a wild hair and like to do things with food, so I might be using a steamer or the oven or a special recipe that involves a custom food mold that I have to make myself.Does your work affect your body in any way?
I do a lot of body part casting, so on occasion, I might be walking around the studio with Vaseline all over my head and face, or bits of alginate on my neck or hands. I have to wear a respirator for casting plastics and toxic materials and sometimes get paint on my hands.

In one sentence, what do you love about your work?
It energizes me and makes me feel like a kid again.

Victoria Hanley writes both fiction and nonfiction and is published in twelve languages. She’s lived in California, Massachusetts, Wisconsin, New Mexico, Oregon, and now Loveland. Her books have received awards and honors nationally and internationally, but the Lighthouse Beacon Award is the one that means the most to her.

 

Victoria Hanley

Victoria Hanley

What’s a surprising piece of equipment that you use for your craft?
Sometimes I still use a pen.
Does your work affect your body in anyway?
Drops of blood form on my forehead.
In one sentence, what do you love about your work?
I love making deep and real connections with people.
Making the Mountain happens this Saturday, December 10, from 7:00 to 9:00 PM. Come early for the Beacon Award ceremony at 6:30 PM. RSVP here.